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labor



  • “Making a Living by the Sweat of Her Brow”: Hazel Dickens and a Life of Work

    by Emily Hilliard

    "Hazel’s song catalog is often divided into separate categories of personal songs, women’s songs, and labor songs. But in her view and experience, these issues all bled together; her songs address struggle against any form of domination and oppression, whether of women, workers, or herself."



  • ‘There’s No Natural Dignity in Work’

    by Ezra Klein

    Is it time to revisit the basic premise of American welfare policies that encouraging or requiring paid labor is the best way to deal with poverty? 



  • How Will the Pandemic Shape the Future of Work?

    by Judy Stephenson

    The pandemic is exposing the historical contingency of "jobs" as opposed to "tasks" – as capital returns to a piecework model in the gig economy, the concept of job security is in danger of vanishing. 



  • ‘Despised’ Review: The Left and the Working Class

    by Jonathan Rose

    Historian Jonathan Rose reviews a book by British firefighter and "left conservative" Paul Embery which identifies the collapse of both working class communities and open debate in Britain as factors in the demise of Labour as a political force. 



  • How Civilization Broke Our Brains

    The anthropologist James Suzman's book evaluates the ravages of modern capitalist civilization – in particular, the institution of work –  on individual and collective psychology. 



  • Labor Pulse: Is This Election Labor's Last Chance?

    by Jim Castagnera

    The election presents organized labor with a choice between a death sentence and a reprieve that will prove temporary unless unions can put their needs at the center of a Biden presidency's priorities. 



  • Why I Quit Academe for a Coding Boot Camp

    by Zeb Larson

    Delusions about the availability of "alt-ac" jobs for new humanities PhDs are stopping graduate students from making informed career choices and covering up the academic profession's failures to recognize and act on crisis. 



  • Look What Has Been Taken From Black Americans

    It's difficult to quantify the financial cost to Black Americans of racism and segregation. But the destruction of property and denial of trade by white mobs in Elaine, Arkansas in 1919 was quantified by Ida B. Wells-Barnett; her findings can put the scope of a reparations program into some perspective.



  • Rosie the Riveters gathered on Labor Day to Honor the Working Women of WWII

    "The Rosies and veterans then told stories from the front lines. One Rosie said she was shocked at the idea of wearing pants to work. A veteran recalled being shot down from the sky in northern Italy and receiving notes from Rosies back home full of profanities toward Hitler."



  • Why We Started the #ScholarStrike

    by Anthea Butler and Kevin Gannon

    As American history shows, there are times where the most powerful way that workers can force an issue or work for change is to withhold what others see as their most important feature: their labor.