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human rights



  • Police Sexual Violence Is Hidden in Plain Sight

    by Anne Gray Fischer

    How did we get to the point where sexual assault is considered valid, necessary police work? The answer lies in the origin story of modern police, and specifically in the history of the discretionary enforcement of public order laws.



  • New Statues Stoke Sensitivity Between South Korea, Japan

    A pair of new statues in South Korea of a man kneeling in front of a girl symbolizing a victim of sexual slavery by Japan's wartime military is the latest subject of diplomatic sensitivity between the countries, with Tokyo's government spokesperson questioning whether the male figure represents the Japanese prime minister.


  • Did the Atomic Bomb End the Pacific War? – Part II

    by Paul Ham

    Japan's surrender was hastened by imminent invasion by the Soviet Red Army, a crippling US naval blockade and conventional bombing, and a diplomatic promise to protect the Japanese Emperor from execution, argues Paul Ham. Granting undue credit to the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki excuses atrocity. 


  • Healing And Reconciling History 100 Years After the Elaine Race Massacre

    by J. Chester Johnson

    The author's realization that his beloved grandfather had participated in a racist massacre in Elaine, Arkansas led him to an unlikely journey of reconciliation with a descendent of one of the victims of that campaign of terror, and an understanding of the need for honesty about how heritage can excuse racism.



  • Sanctions Are Inhumane—Now, and Always

    by Aslı U. Bâli, Aziz Rana

    In a world imperiled by global pandemic, it is long past time to put an end to sanctions—including new ones against Iran—and to reconstruct U.S. foreign policy around international solidarity.